Listening

Someone called Anne

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Someone called Anne - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/someone-called-anne

This pair of sentences could almost be phrasal homophones (oronyms), except for the differences in punctuation. They play with the fact that the sound bite 'call Dan' is identical to the sound bite 'called Anne'. There are also two meanings of 'called' (to phone or shout out to someone or to be named), which make the pair of sentences rather confusing!

Sick Spies or Six Pies?

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Sick Spies or Six Pies? - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/sick-spies-or-six-pies

Look at the pictures. Are the two pictures: a. a minimal pair, b. homophones, c. whatever?

Acoustic Drills and Audio Concordances

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Acoustic Drills and Audio Concordances - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/acoustic-drills-and-audio-concordances

There is something missing at the heart of the listening component in most ELT course materials. They fail to dig deep into the actual raw material of the skill – what Richard Cauldwell calls the ‘sound substance’.

Making Listening Memorable: Listening in chunks

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 10:15
Venue: 
TESOL-Spain
Location: 
Vitoria-Gasteiz
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Listening in chunks

When it comes to ‘doing’ listening, many students feel they are starting from scratch rather than building on what they have already mastered. In this workshop, we’ll discuss the notion of ‘verbal stickiness’, and consider how we could exploit this phenomenon by focusing on various language patterns and using different activities to help students become more efficient and fluent listeners.

Pronunciation for Listeners

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 14:00
Venue: 
Driestar conference
Location: 
Houten, Netherlands
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Pronunciation for Listeners - hancockmcdonald.com/talks/pronunciation-listeners-0

Pronunciation is just as important for listening as for speaking. In this workshop, we will look at what features make connected speech difficult to follow. We will try out a series of tasks and games for raising awareness of these features. Finally, I will suggest how teachers can prepare their own micro-listening activities.

The Challenges of Unscripted Language

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 16:45
Venue: 
TESOL France
Location: 
Telecom ParisTech, 46 rue Barrault, 75013 Paris, France
Extra info: 
Includes handouts
The Challenges of Unscripted Language - hancockmcdonald.com/talks/challenges-unscripted-language

Unscripted language is usually very different to the spoken language students encounter when doing listening activities in a general English course. Consequently, when students come to listen to spontaneous chat or discussion they are faced with many difficulties. What might these be and what can we teachers do about it?

Learning Listening: The Challenges of Unscripted Langauge

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Saturday, October 3, 2015 - 14:45
Venue: 
English UK North Academic Conference 2015, Liverpool
Location: 
LILA, New Barrett House, 47 North John Street
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Learning Listening in Liverpool

Many students studying English want (or even need) to be able to understand the spontaneous, unscripted speech they find themselves immersed in as people chat away around them. For students schooled on a diet of scripted ELT material the challenge is truly daunting; for teachers wishing to help, the unruly nature of conversational spoken English makes it difficult to know where to start.

The Parasol

The Parasol - hancockmcdonald.com/materials/parasol

This song is based on a painting by Francisco de Goya in the Prado Museum in Madrid. The lyric refers to Goya as 'he', the girl in the painting as 'you' and the singer himself as 'I'. It speculates as to why the boy stands holding the parasol for the girl.

Learning Listening: The challenge of unscripted language

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 12:15
Venue: 
IATEFL 2015
Location: 
Manchester Central
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Learning Listening

On the surface of it, unscripted language is a total mess, and it's a wonder that anybody can understand any of it. It stops and starts, interrupts and stumbles, slows and accelerates, and generally breaks all the grammar rules you’ve ever learnt. So, how can we help learners to make sense of it?

Learning Listening: The challenge of unscripted language

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Saturday, March 7, 2015 - 10:45
Venue: 
Universidad de Salamanca, Facultad de Filologia
Location: 
Salamanca, Spain
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Learning Listening with Unscripted Language

It’s nearly time for the 38th TESOL-Spain National Convention, where this year, as well as catching up with friends, I’ll be presenting on Learning Listening: The challenge of unscripted language.

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