Pronunciation

The Sound of Silence

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The Sound of Silence - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/sound-silence

Last class, a South Korean student told me about his weekend visit to Liverpool. He said it wasn’t easy to understand the local way of speaking, and gave the example of the question word What? He demonstrated how this word had been said, with the final ‘t’ replaced with a silence, or glottal stop, so it sounds like wha’?

Pronunciation Problems

Pronunciation problems by Mark Hancock

The long and short i sounds cause problems for a lot of learners, who cannot hear or produce the difference between pairs of words like bin and bean.

Corner to Corner

Corner to Corner - hancockmcdonald.com/materials/corner-corner

This activity is a free sample from PronPack 2: Pronunciation Puzzles. It can be very tricky to distinguish /s/ from /z/ at the end of a word. Try this maze to see if you can do it. If you find it hard, try two strategies:

Tongue Cats

Tongue Cats - hancockmcdonald.com/materials/tongue-cats

This activity is a free sample from PronPack 1: Pronunciation Workouts. It focuses on raising awareness of the role of the tongue, jaw and lips in forming the vowel sounds.

Air Traffic Control

PronPack 3 sample material

This activity is a free sample from PronPack 3: Pronunciation Pairworks. A minimal pair is a pair of words or phrases with identical pronunciation except for one phoneme.

Accent: are we bovvered?

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Accent: are we bovvered? - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/accent-are-we-bovvered

Many teachers worry about what the best model accent should be, and whether their own accent serves as a suitable model. My argument is that the premise of the question is wrong – there needn’t be a single model accent, and that the teacher’s own accent will usually be the best model, providing that the teacher is an intelligible speaker of English.

A new look for English Pronunciation in Use

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Event date: 
Saturday, April 1, 2017 - 10:15
A new look for English Pronunciation in Use - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/new-look-english-pronunciation-use

English Pronunciation in Use gets a new look this month. The new cover design comes along with a new approach to audio - instead of being on a set of 5 CDs (which were expensive), the audio is now a free online download. Makes the whole package much more affordable.

To articulate or not to articulate, that is the question

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To articulate or not to articulate, that is the question - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/articulate-or-not-articulate-question

In speaking styles, there is a continuum between mumbling and rolling your ‘r’s –. What I mean by mumbling here is speaking with as little mouth movement as possible in order to minimize effort on the part of the speaker.

Pronunciation for Listeners

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Monday, February 6, 2017 - 14:00
Venue: 
University of Chester
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Pronunciation for Listeners - hancockmcdonald.com/talks/pronunciation-listeners-1

In this session, we look at pronunciation from the perspective of listening. Find the slides on a PDF below. Here are links to some of the materials used in the talk.

The "Lost" Rap

A song-based Mondegreen activity

Long jumper

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Long jumper - hancockmcdonald.com/blog/long-jumper

"My sister went out with a long jumper". Here's a claim with two meanings, and reading it, you'd never be sure which was intended. But hearing it would clarify things, because the speaker has a way of communicating the intended meaning. It's the vocal effort known as 'stress'. "Long jumper" (athlete) is two words acting as a single lexical item.

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