Pronunciation

Woman and Wolf

Woman and Wolf - hancockmcdonald.com/materials/woman-and-wolf

The English phoneme /w/ presents difficulties for learners from a wide range of language backgrounds, but not always for the same reason. Some pronounce the /w/ like a /v/ so that west becomes vest. Others interpret it as a vowel sound, so that woman becomes ooman.

PronPack 5: Pronunciation of English for Spanish Speakers

PronPack 5: Pronunciation of English for Spanish Speakers - hancockmcdonald.com/books/titles/pronpack-5-pronunciation-english-spanish-speakers

PronPack 5: Pronunciation of English for Spanish Speakers provides materials for 18 lessons focusing on common difficulties faced by Spanish-speaking learners.

Pronunciation: Muscle, Mind, Meaning, Memory

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Thursday, July 30, 2020 - 13:00
Venue: 
TESOL SPLIS Webinar
Location: 
TESOL International
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Pronunciation: Muscle, Mind, Meaning, Memory - hancockmcdonald.com/talks/pronunciation-muscle-mind-meaning-memory-5

This webinar looks at four kinds of classroom activities and materials for teaching pronunciation. Here are links to the resources mentioned in the talk:

The chart

A maze

IPA: Symbols of Power?

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Publication: 
Modern English Teacher 29.3 July 2020
Mark Hancock IPA Symbols of Power
This article, which first appeared in Modern English Teacher 29.3 (July 2020), argues for a more democratic use of the IPA phonemic symbols in English language teaching.

Pronunciation and Privilege

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Pronunciation and Privilege by Mark Hancock
This short article is a reflection on the privilege wrongfully enjoyed by 'native speakers' in the world of ELT.

Mazes, Maps, Rhymes & Raps: Pronunciation Made Practical

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Saturday, February 8, 2020 - 12:45
Venue: 
IH Barcelona
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Mazes, Maps, Rhymes & Raps: Pronunciation Made Practical - hancockmcdonald.com/node/620/edit

Pronunciation teaching can be a joy – it doesn’t have to be all complicated theory and difficult symbols. With a playful and experimental approach, it can be a part of the lesson that your students look forward to most. In this session, we will take a look at some example activities designed to practise some of the pronunciation features that Spanish learners need to focus on.

Pronunciation Teaching Post-ELF

Event date: 
Friday, February 7, 2020 - 18:00
Venue: 
IH Barcelona
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
Mark Hancock at #ihbcnelt

 Most learners today need English to communicate in a lingua franca (ELF) environment. The recognition of this fact has disrupted pronunciation teaching. What model can learners aspire to if not a ‘native speaker’ model? What can be considered ‘correct’ or ‘incorrect’? In this talk, we will look at what is to become of pronunciation teaching these post-ELF times.

IPA: Symbols of Power?

Speaker: 
Event date: 
Saturday, March 7, 2020 - 10:00
Venue: 
TESOL Spain
Location: 
Salamanca. via video link
Extra info: 
Plus downloads
IPA: Symbols of Power? - hancockmcdonald.com/node/618/edit

Phonemic symbols – we love them or hate them, but often for the wrong reasons. For some, they are symbols of an elite accent which is not our own. But there is an alternative way of viewing them which is less prescriptive and more tolerant of accent variation. From this angle, they can be symbols of empowerment.

Rabbit in a Hat

Rabbit in a Hat - hancockmcdonald.com/node/616/edit

This rap is great for practising connected speech. Consonant to vowel links are indicated, plus one vowel to vowel link. You will also see that there are a number of /r/ /h/ minimal pairs in the rap: rat-hat, rabbit-habbit, red-head.

Squabbles

Squabbles - hancockmcdonald.com/node/615/edit

A phrase usually has one word which is stressed more than the rest. Normally it is the last content word of the phrase. For example, the normal stress on You never help me is on help. It’s not on me because me is not a content word but a function word.

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